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Unsigned Artists

Content Distribution

DISTRIBUTION TO ALL MAJOR PLATFORMS

Release your music to all major online stores and streaming platforms at no upfront fee. Set up your releases with pre-order and streaming exclusive dates to get the most out of your campaigns.

PUBLISHING & ROYALTY COLLECTION

Register your songs for monetization, and collect your performance royalties from all your gigs and radio plays at the click of a button.

LIVE & SYNCHRONISATION OPPORTUNITIES

Gain access to showcase opportunities in the UK, USA, Europe and Asia as you progress. Add your best songs to our music library and be pitched for synchronization into film & TV.

INDUSTRY TIPS FOR ALL LEVELS

Get the exclusive know how from high level industry professionals. We have insight from the PRS, BBC, managers, producers, sync & live agents, festival managers and more.

M12 Label Partners

M12 has agreements with label partners such as Island Kings Music Group. Island Kings Music Group is a fully functional division to aggregate, administer, distribute and market content through M12/Mahvrick’s distribution and media outlets worldwide.

What do I need to release my music?

If you want to release your music, all you need is a 16 or 24 bit WAV file of your track, a JPEG image for your artwork that’s at least 2000 x 2000 pixels, and the information about when you want the track to be released, and who the writers are.

What online stores will be music be sent to?

Through its agreement with Universal Music Group, M12 sends your music to over 800 online stores around the world, including all the big ones. Spotify, iTunes, Google Play, Apple Music, Deezer, Amazon are all included!

How and when does M12 pay me? We pay all our users through PayPal. Simply add your PayPal email address or other banking information into the ‘Finances’ page and we will pay you your income within 30 days of all payments received the prior month (from all providers)!

Collecting My Royalties

How many royalties should I expect?

This again depends on the magnitude of the claim. Small venues may pay anywhere between $5 and $10, medium sized venues $10 to $30, and big venues and festivals even higher. One payment for a single show may not seem like much, but if you are an actively gigging artist who plays 20+ gigs per year, you could be earning a nice little chunk of money from this!

How long does it take for my royalties to come through?

Depending on the magnitude of the claim, your royalties can take up to 18 months to process. This is because the PRS only process claims four times per year and claims from major venues can take even longer. Sometimes, your claims will clear within 9 months!

Why do I need my M12ID?

Once we create a publishing relationship with you, If you input your artist M12ID into the publishing page, it lets us pull all your gig listings from M12ID, and convert these into claims without the need to type them all out again!

Why do I need to create songs, if they aren’t even recorded?

You need to create songs on your M12 account so we can submit these to the PRS as registrations, this then allows these songs to begin earning money each time they are played. It doesn’t matter if the song is not recorded yet, as it is still your intellectual property, and that is what royalties are for!

What do I earn royalties for?

Whenever you play a live show, this generates performance royalties with the PRS. This money comes from the venue’s PRS licence, which allows them to have live music performed on their premises. You can also earn royalties for radio play or features on TV.

Do I still own my music if I upload it to M12?

When you sign either of the user agreements, you simply give M12 the license to work with your music. During this time, M12 administers the rights belonging to the songs, but you always retain the full ownership of the songs.

What does the Publishing Agreement mean?

M12’s Publishing Agreement grants M12 the right to publish your music, and collect royalties from your music on your behalf. We then take our agreed upon % split of the royalties and pay the rest to you. Easy! This agreement can be cancelled and the license be revoked with 28 days of deactivating your account. But we hope you won’t want to!

What does the Distribution Agreement mean?

M12’s Distribution Agreement grants M12 the license to release your music onto online stores. We then collect the income from your releases, take an agreed upon % split, and give you the rest! Simple! This agreement can be cancelled and the license be revoked within 28 days of deactivating your account. But we hope you won’t want to!

Releasing My Music

What is a streaming release date?

With the significance of Spotify and streaming figures in the modern industry, it can sometimes be useful to upload your track to Spotify before it goes up for sale on other stores. This gives people a chance to listen to your track, and for your track to amass listens before it’s release, which helps massively with your chances of playlisting, radio play and getting your track reviewed. If you don’t want to do this however, you don’t have to, and your track will be on Spotify the same day as all the other stores!

Why should I release my music on a Friday?

Most major online stores update their catalogues on Fridays. If you select to release your music on a Wednesday, chances are it won’t appear then, it will appear on the Friday. Also, people are also more likely to buy your music on a Friday, as it’s the day when most people are paid, and are in the mood for new music for the weekend!

Why can I only release my music with a two-week lead time?

This is because most major stores can take two weeks to update their catalogues. Stores like Spotify and iTunes are dealing with millions of tracks every day, so it’s easy for them to miss some out. If you give your release a two-week timeframe, it allows all the online stores to have your release ready on the date that you want! Some other distributors let you rush your releases through, but if you are invested in building a proper career in music, this isn’t the way to go. You need long lead times to put real release plans into effect. Rushing your releases out is a recipe for disaster.

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